In The News

Noise Charge Dropped

June 21st, 2007

Newsday


“Judge throws out case against Bayville couple accused of letting their kids play too loudly in their pool”

Village Court Judge threw out the case after the couple’s attorney, Andrew J. Campanelli, asked that the charges be dismissed.

Couple Fights Back Against Allegations of Stealing Signals

October 5th, 2004

New York Law Journal


“Accused of stealing signals through a satellite TV antenna their lawyer says they never had, a Lynbrook couple is seeking permission to file a countersuit charging the satellite programming giant DirectTV with racketeering and extortion. “They have no evidence that my clients pirated a signal,” defense attorney Andrew J. Campanelli of Mineola said.”

“Nevertheless, his clients were named as defendants in an action filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York. That suit is one of more than 100 anti-piracy actions filed by DirectTV against more than 400 Long Island defendants since May 2003.”

The federal lawsuit against Mr. Campanelli’s clients was ultimately withdrawn against them.

Suozzi Says Revved up DWI Program is a Success

December 11th, 2002

Newsday


Officials: Sales of impounded cars grossed $903G this year

Nassau County Executive declares revamped DWI seizure program an unmitigated success. Sales of forfeited drunk driving vehicles grossed $903G in the first 10 months of this year, whereas the program previously only generated an average of $58,000 per year in the previous years of 1999, 2000 and 2001. The difference, the County Executive said, is a contract with attorney Andrew J. Campanelli, for him to run the program and handle the prosecution of DWI forfeiture cases. Although the DWI seizure program reduced drunk driving offenses in the County by one third, it had been operating so inefficiently, that forfeiture cases languished, and seized cars sat in storage, with storage costs rising as high as $1,000 per day. Under Campanelli’s control, storage costs were reduced by ninety (90%) percent.

In the first year within which the County of Nassau retained Campanelli to run its DWI seizure program, Campanelli increased the rate of disposition of the County’s forfeiture cases by one thousand five hundred (1,500%) percent, and he increased the revenues generated by the program by more than one thousand eight hundred (1,800 %) percent, with more than $1.1 million collected in cash, and an additional $350,000 worth of vehicles being forfeited to the County in 2002 alone. [Link – See 2002 Year End Progress Report]

Hamptons Zoning Battle Goes to Trial – Developer Found Protected by First Amendment

February 2nd, 2001

New York Law Journal


In a case of first impression, a United States District Court Judge has ruled that a developer’s right to file zoning applications falls within the protections guaranteed under the 1st Amendment. The Court agreed with the developer’s attorney, Andrew J. Campanelli that the filing of zoning applications falls within the purview of petitioning government for the redress of grievances, which is explicitly afforded protection under the 1st Amendment. As such, the plaintiff developer can proceed to trial based upon its claim that the Town of Southampton retaliated against it for having filed an application seeking to build a McDonalds restaurant to which Town planners were opposed.

Three days into trial, the Town agreed to settle the federal lawsuit, which Mr. Campanelli had filed in federal court, by paying Mr. Campanelli’s clients $250,000 in damages, granting them permission to build a 25,000 square foot supermarket on property which was zoned “residential” and granting them an additional approval to construct a 10,000 square foot office building across the street.

McWin For Fast Food in Hampton Bays

August 16th, 2000

Suffolk Life


Developers who were seeking to build a McDonalds restaurant in Hampton Bays won a “major court victory” when a state Supreme Court Judge nullified a Southampton Town Law and reversed a denial of a building permit application for the McDonalds.

Andrew J. Campanelli, an attorney representing the developer, Hampton Bays Connections, also filed a federal lawsuit within which the property owner and developer are seeking $17 million in federal court for alleged civil rights damages.”

Mr. Campanelli’s clients were ultimately successful in obtaining the building permit for the McDonalds restaurant, which was then built, and is operating. The Town additionally agreed to settle the federal lawsuit which Mr. Campanelli had filed in federal court by paying Mr. Campanelli’s clients $250,000 in damages, granting them permission to build a 25,000 square foot supermarket on property which was zoned “residential” and granting them an additional approval to construct a 10,000 square foot office building across the street.